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A spectacular chiasm in Luke 22

A spectacular chiasm in Luke 22

This one really is remarkable. It's hard to think of a more elegant and insightful way in which Luke could have highlighted the transition from Old Covenant Passover feast to New Covenant Lord's Supper than this. Right down to the tiniest lexical details, the Passover Lamb [pascha] has become the Paschal Christ [paschō]. Glorious.

Luke 22:1-22

1Now the Feast of Unleavened Bread drew near, which is called the Passover.

Chief priests and scribes seeking

2And the chief priests and the scribes were seeking [zēteō] how to put him to death, for they feared the people.

The betrayer is with the chief priests and officers

3Then Satan entered into Judas called Iscariot, who was of the number of the twelve. 4He went away and conferred with the chief priests and officers how he might betray [paradidōmi] him to them. 5And they were glad, and agreed to give him money. 6So he consented and sought an opportunity to betray [paradidōmi] him to them in the absence of a crowd.

The disciples prepare the Old Covenant Passover

7Then came the day of Unleavened Bread, on which the Passover lamb had to be sacrificed. 8So Jesus sent Peter and John, saying, "Go and prepare the Passover for us, that we may eat it." 9They said to him, "Where will you have us prepare it?" 10He said to them, "Behold, when you have entered the city, a man carrying a jar of water will meet you. Follow him into the house that he enters 11and tell the master of the house, 'The Teacher says to you, Where is the guest room, where I may eat the Passover with my disciples?' 12And he will show you a large upper room furnished; prepare it there." 13And they went and found it just as he had told them, and they prepared the Passover. 14And when the hour came, he reclined at table, and the apostles with him.

Transition from Old Covenant Passover to New Covenant Suffering Christ

15And he said to them, "I have earnestly desired to eat this Passover [pascha] with you before I suffer [paschō].

Jesus hosts the New Covenant Passover

16For I tell you I will not eat it until it is fulfilled in the kingdom of God." 17And he took a cup, and when he had given thanks he said, "Take this, and divide it among yourselves. 18For I tell you that from now on I will not drink of the fruit of the vine until the kingdom of God comes." 19And he took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and gave it to them, saying, "This is my body, which is given for you. Do this in remembrance of me." 20And likewise the cup after they had eaten, saying, "This cup that is poured out for you is the new covenant in my blood.

The betrayer is with Jesus

21But behold, the hand of him who betrays [paradidōmi] me is with me on the table. 22For the Son of Man goes as it has been determined, but woe to that man by whom he is betrayed [paradidōmi]!"

Disciples seeking

23And they began to question [suzēteō] one another, which of them it could be who was going to do this.

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